Higher-Music.com

Mar 08

YouTube

A week ago, a friend sent me a link to a YouTube channel with many, many, many full length albums uploaded. This channel’s extended album collection featured about 30 Hemi-Sync® albums from various artists, including seven of my own.

I notified YouTube, limiting my claim to the seven videos to which I hold legal copyright. YouTube chose to remove her channel. She has since contacted me to let me know that she bought all of those albums and they were “hers”. 

Her Facebook profile says that she is a student at The University of Law - London Bloomsbury. If this is true, might I suggest an intellectual property class or two? It might help her understand in which ways these are “her” albums and in which ways they are not.

Mar 03

My list of meditation albums with binaural beats (or Hemi-Sync®) and how to use them -

I’ve added Remembrance to my list of albums with binaural beats (or Hemi-Sync®) and how to use them. 

http://blog.higher-music.com/post/69098173635/do-you-have-a-guide-for-your-music-what-each-album-is

Feb 28

Anonymous said: I recently purchased Gammadrone, but since I'm still a bit uneducated about the Gamma wave frequency, I'm curious to know if it can be used as a dream/sleep aid besides a meditation aid. Would this frequency keep me awake? I know I can just listen to it and find out, but I want to be able to use it properly in an appropriate and optimized environment. Thank you!

Gammadrone was created for light meditation. The Gamma and Hypergamma frequencies used in Gammadrone aren’t necessarily conducive for use during sleep. Further, the music is running at about 72 BPM, which is slightly higher than a resting heart rate.

Having said that, anything is possible.

And for what it’s worth, I find that a lot of writers have let me know that Gammadrone really helps with their creative flow. Of course they’re writers, so maybe they’re just more likely to send a note. ;-)

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Feb 25

[video]

Calm, Creative, Focus

This quote was pulled from the page of Jonathan Cainer’s Astrology site http://www.cainer.com/ on Tuesday, 25 February 2014.

Hi Jonathan,

You recently published my letter about the three little words I say when I want to enter a meditative state. You then wondered what those words were. They are: ‘calm, creative, focus’. I came up with this while walking and listening to a relaxation CD called Illumination For Creative Focus. I added the word ‘calm’ in the hope it might quieten my mind. Sometimes too, I visualise a ‘happy place’ where my son and I snorkel with turtles.

Angela

Feb 24

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Feb 22

neurosciencestuff:

Figure 1: Typical slow gamma (left), fast gamma (center) and theta (right) brain-wave patterns measured during voluntary actions in rats.
Banding together to control movement
Synchrony is critical for the proper functioning of the brain. Synchronous firing of neurons within regions of the brain and synchrony between brain waves in different regions facilitate information processing, yet researchers know very little about these neural codes. Now, new research led by Tomoki Fukai of the RIKEN Brain Science Institute reveals how one region of the brain uses multiple brain-wave frequency bands to control movement.
Control of movement requires activation of numerous muscle groups in correct sequence, a function achieved by the motor cortex. To investigate the contribution of brain waves to this process, Fukai and his colleagues inserted multi-channel electrodes into the motor cortex of rats to record brain-wave patterns as the animals learned to push, hold and then pull a lever to obtain a food reward. They also developed a machine-learning technique to extract spike sequences of individual neurons from the recorded waves. 
Fukai and his colleagues found that brain waves of different frequencies appeared during distinct stages of the movements. Fast gamma waves, with frequencies of around 100 hertz, were most prominent when the rats pushed or pulled the lever, whereas slow gamma waves, with frequencies of 25–40 hertz, peaked when the rats held the lever to prepare for the next pull. Theta waves (4–10 hertz) peaked while the rats held the lever, and the initiation of the pulling movement coincided with a specific phase of these oscillations (Fig. 1).
Both frequencies of gamma waves were coupled to the theta waves such that the peaks of all three brain-wave frequencies occurred at the same time. The activity of different types of nerve cells in different layers of the motor cortex was also synchronized with specific brain-wave frequencies. Importantly, cells encoding different stages of the sequential movements fired in distinct phases of the theta waves. 
The results suggest that theta waves play an important role in coordinating the neuronal activity underlying the planning and execution of voluntary movement. Theta waves are known to be important for the processing of spatial information in the hippocampus, but this is the first time that a similar code has been observed in the motor cortex.
“We are currently using machine-learning techniques to study how phase-locked spikes in different layers of the motor cortex encode motor information,” says Fukai. “We are also studying whether a similar oscillatory coordination takes place in the prefrontal cortex during decision-making.”

neurosciencestuff:

Figure 1: Typical slow gamma (left), fast gamma (center) and theta (right) brain-wave patterns measured during voluntary actions in rats.

Banding together to control movement

Synchrony is critical for the proper functioning of the brain. Synchronous firing of neurons within regions of the brain and synchrony between brain waves in different regions facilitate information processing, yet researchers know very little about these neural codes. Now, new research led by Tomoki Fukai of the RIKEN Brain Science Institute reveals how one region of the brain uses multiple brain-wave frequency bands to control movement.

Control of movement requires activation of numerous muscle groups in correct sequence, a function achieved by the motor cortex. To investigate the contribution of brain waves to this process, Fukai and his colleagues inserted multi-channel electrodes into the motor cortex of rats to record brain-wave patterns as the animals learned to push, hold and then pull a lever to obtain a food reward. They also developed a machine-learning technique to extract spike sequences of individual neurons from the recorded waves. 

Fukai and his colleagues found that brain waves of different frequencies appeared during distinct stages of the movements. Fast gamma waves, with frequencies of around 100 hertz, were most prominent when the rats pushed or pulled the lever, whereas slow gamma waves, with frequencies of 25–40 hertz, peaked when the rats held the lever to prepare for the next pull. Theta waves (4–10 hertz) peaked while the rats held the lever, and the initiation of the pulling movement coincided with a specific phase of these oscillations (Fig. 1).

Both frequencies of gamma waves were coupled to the theta waves such that the peaks of all three brain-wave frequencies occurred at the same time. The activity of different types of nerve cells in different layers of the motor cortex was also synchronized with specific brain-wave frequencies. Importantly, cells encoding different stages of the sequential movements fired in distinct phases of the theta waves. 

The results suggest that theta waves play an important role in coordinating the neuronal activity underlying the planning and execution of voluntary movement. Theta waves are known to be important for the processing of spatial information in the hippocampus, but this is the first time that a similar code has been observed in the motor cortex.

“We are currently using machine-learning techniques to study how phase-locked spikes in different layers of the motor cortex encode motor information,” says Fukai. “We are also studying whether a similar oscillatory coordination takes place in the prefrontal cortex during decision-making.”

Feb 21

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